Bromofluorochloromethane (CHClBrF)

The molecule has two enantiomers: stereoisomers that are mirror images of each other and are not superimposable.

Phenol (C₆H₅OH)

The simplest of the aromatic hydroxy compounds.

Sulphur (S₈)

An odourless, yellow, solid substance, the 16th most common in the Earth´s crust. One of the best known sulphur compounds is pyrite, also known as ´fool´s...

Oleic acid (cis-octadec-9-enoic acid) (C₁₇H₃₃COOH)

An unsaturated monocarboxylic acid. The molecule contains double bond in cis orientation.

Clothing (Western Europe, 13th century)

Clothing reflects the lifestyle and culture of the region's inhabitants.

Water (H₂O)

Water is a very stable compound of hydrogen and oxygen, vital for all known forms of life. In nature it occurs in liquid, solid and gaseous state.

Clothing (Western Europe, 14th century)

Clothing reflects the lifestyle and culture of the region's inhabitants.

Molecule exercise VI (Carbohydrates)

An exercise about the groups and structure of mono-, di- and polysaccharides.

Hydroxide ion (OH⁻)

A compound ion formed when a water molecule releases a proton.

Cellobiose (C₁₂H₂₂O₁₁)

Cellobiose is the basic structural unit of cellulose.

Carbamide (urea) (CO(NH₂)₂)

An organic compound in the urine of mammals, used in the production of fertilisers as a source of nitrogen.

Benzene (C₆H₆)

Benzene is the simplest aromatic hydrocarbon.

Hydronium ion (H₃O⁺)

The presence of hydronium ions relative to hydroxide ions determines a solution´s pH.

Sulphate ion (SO₄²⁻)

A compound ion produced when sulphuric acid releases protons.

Chlorine (Cl₂)

A yellow-green toxic gas with a strong odour, one of the halogens.

D-ribose (C₅H₁₀O₅)

The open-chain version of ribose, which occurs naturally in nucleic acids, coenzymes, nucleotides and nucleosides.

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